Individual Therapy

Deciding to begin psychotherapy can feel daunting or frightening, and finding a good match with a therapist is important. In my 40 years of practice as a psychotherapist, it has been an honor and a privilege to work with so many patients on their paths of exploration, personal growth, and healing. While many individuals and couples come to me with clinical issues, others have sought my assistance to improve their quality of life and sense of well-being. I continue to very much enjoy my profession and am grateful to my patients for allowing me to walk with them through difficult and challenging times in their lives. My approach is grounded in existential and psychodynamic theories, with a focus on integrating mindfulness and compassion into relationships with self and others.

INDIVIDUAL Psychotherapy Treatment

  • Aging—Retirement Concerns
  • Addiction—Alcohol and Drug Abuse
  • Anger Management
  • Anxiety—Excessive Worry
  • Career Counseling—Workplace Issues
  • Chronic Illness
  • Codependency
  • Depression
  • Divorce—Separation
  • Family of Origin Issues
  • Grief
  • Meditation—Mindfulness
  • Narcissistic Personality Disorder
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
  • Parenting
  • Relationship Issues
  • Self-Esteem
  • Sexual Abuse
  • Shame
  • Trauma and PTSD

Psychotherapy for Individual Adults in Nashville, TN

My approach to psychotherapy combines what I have learned in my formal education as a psychologist, in 40 years of working with my patients, in my own ongoing continuing education as a psychologist, and in many years of personal psychotherapy for myself.

In a recent paper, fellow Nashville psychologist Tom Neilson, Psy.D., wrote insightfully about why patients come for psychotherapy. He stated that patients “come to us with maps of the world that make their lives difficult. Their maps are narrow, out of date, and inaccurate, and they cause suffering. The most common map that brings people to therapy is one that represents the (patient) as flawed, deficient, and inadequate. Other problematic maps include those that see the world as a fundamentally unsafe or uncaring place, and those that view others as untrustworthy and uncaring. (Some patients) come to us with narcissistic maps that represent the self as superior and others as inferior.”

We all develop our particular maps, or character structure, in order to survive childhood. Then, as adults, our maps interfere with our ability to develop fulfilling lives, satisfying relationships, and peace of mind. I work in a depth model where the focus is on addressing your underlying character structure and core beliefs about the world. I believe it is important to understand how you got to where you are in your life, or else you are likely to repeat the same patterns again. This usually entails working on a weekly or twice-weekly basis over a period of time.

My involvement with Buddhist meditation and philosophy for over 40 years has led me to believe that we are all capable of developing peace of mind. My theoretical approach as a psychotherapist makes use of psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, existential, and Buddhist theory in a combination that is tailored to the needs of my patient. Change can be related to not only a new understanding of one’s individual and relational patterns, but also to a new experience of relationship with your therapist and with others.

The relationship with your therapist is key for psychotherapy to be successful. It is crucial to have a therapist with whom you feel comfortable, and in whom you can place your trust and confidence. I will work with you towards understanding yourself in deeper ways. The process at times can include upsetting feelings and periods of turbulence.

Psychotherapy has been shown to have benefit for most people who undertake it. Therapy often leads to a significant reduction in feelings of distress, to improvements in relationships, and to resolution of specific problems. The effectiveness of psychotherapy usually results from a combination of the therapeutic relationship, intellectual understanding, and emotional expression.

If you change some of the ways that you relate to yourself and to the world, then your relationships likely will change. Some of those close to you may love your new self, but others may not. Some relationships may drop away if you are not playing out the same old roles. Often healthier relationships will develop in time. I believe that the outcome is worth the effort and investment required. I believe that good psychotherapy is one of the most underestimated processes available to people in our world. Together we can work towards creating the life that you wish to be living.